Posters across campus are now encouraging students to “be superheroes” by helping save lives.

The posters are intended to publicize the upcoming Blood Drive on March 23. Hosted by Campus Climate and Board of Directors commissions with the Stanford Blood Center, the biannual drive provides students and community members with the opportunity to donate blood on campus.

The fall Blood Drive was held on Nov. 3 in the gym, where the drive has traditionally been held. However, this semester, according to Campus Climate lead commissioner senior Manvita Tatavarthy, the drive will most likely be held in the cafeteria or in the student center and leadership room due to scheduling conflicts with the P.E. department.

“Because of all the activities on campus coming up [that require the use of the gym], we’ve had to take [PE classes] out of the gym and field house a lot. It’s unfair to them especially because the field [is under construction],” Tatavarthy said.

Juniors Celeste Kim, Chris Song, Roshan Varadarajan and Cathy Ang eat food provided by Leadership after donating blood during the fall Blood Drive on Nov. 3, 2011. The biannual drive will be held again on March 23. Students and community members who wish to donate must be 16 years or older and weigh at least 110 pounds. The Campus Climate and Board of Directors commissions, who host the drive, are hoping for 150 sign ups. Photo by Margaret Lin.

Those who wish to donate must be 16 years or older, weigh at least 110 pounds, have no cold or flu symptoms and meet other medical requirements as explained on the Stanford Blood Center website.

“Pre-screening happens during the event, so we encourage everyone to [sign up to] donate even if you think you [aren’t eligible]. If you can’t, it might have been a waste of time, but at least you tried,” Board of Directors lead senior Derrick Yee said, referring to the medical survey given at the donation site to potential donors. The two commissions are hoping to have at least 150 people sign up.

Each donor will have a pint of blood drawn, which can help save up to four lives, as the blood will be separated into four donations of red blood cells, platelets, plasma and cryoprecipiate. According to the Stanford Blood Center, a pint of blood makes up eight to ten percent of the total blood in one’s circulatory system. The fluid and red blood cells lost in the donation are fully replaced within 24 hours and eight weeks respectively.

Students who do donate will receive “pint for a pint” vouchers from Baskin Robbins — a free pint of ice cream for donating a pint of blood.

But according to Yee, the commissions are avoiding promoting the incentive.

“We don’t want students to focus on the monetary value [of donating] — we want them to focus on making a difference,” Yee said.

Blood Drive sign up forms can be found here or in the office, and are due to the ASB desk in the office by March 21. More information on the blood donating process or on the Stanford Blood Center can be found here.

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